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Soul Music: A Novel of Discworld

Soul Music: A Novel of Discworld

Current price: $9.99
Publication Date: October 29th, 2013
Publisher:
Harper
ISBN:
9780062237415
Pages:
432
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Description

"Pratchett's Discworld yarns . . . are comic masterpieces. This one, unfailingly amusing and sometimes hysterically funny, is recommended for anyone with the slightest trace of a sense of humor." — Kirkus Reviews

The sixteenth novel in the Discworld series from New York Times bestselling author Terry Pratchett  in which Death's granddaughter Susan must take over the family business.

When her dear old Granddad— the Grim Reaper himself—goes missing, Susan takes over the family business. The progeny of Death's adopted daughter and his apprentice, she shows real talent for the trade. That is, until a little string in her heart goes "twang."

With a head full of dreams and a pocketful of lint, Imp the Bard lands in Ankh-Morpork, yearning to become a rock star. Determined to devote his life to music, the unlucky fellow soon finds that all his dreams are coming true. Well almost.

The Discworld novels can be read in any order, but Soul Music is the third book in the Death series and the sixteenth book in the Discworld series. The Death collection includes:

  • Mort
  • The Reaper Man
  • Soul Music
  • Hogfather
  • Thief of Time

About the Author

Terry Pratchett (1948–2015) was the acclaimed creator of the globally revered Discworld series. In all, he authored more than fifty bestselling books, which have sold more than one hundred million copies worldwide. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he was the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal. He was awarded a knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II for his services to literature in 2009, although he always wryly maintained that his greatest service to literature was to avoid writing any.